Tagged: schneier on security

The Changing Economics of Surveillance 0

The Changing Economics of Surveillance

Cory Doctorow examines the changing economics of surveillance and what it means: The Stasi employed one snitch for every 50 or 60 people it watched. We can’t be sure of the size of the entire Five Eyes global surveillance workforce, but there are only about 1.4 million Americans with Top Secret clearance, and many of them don’t work at or for the NSA, which means that the number is smaller than that (the other Five Eyes states have much smaller workforces than the US). This million-ish person workforce keeps six or seven billion people under surveillance — a ratio approaching 1:10,000

Can the NSA Break Microsoft’s BitLocker? 0

Can the NSA Break Microsoft’s BitLocker?

The Intercept has a new story on the CIA’s — yes, the CIA, not the NSA — efforts to break encryption. These are from the Snowden documents, and talk about a conference called the Trusted Computing Base Jamboree. There are some interesting documents associated with the article, but not a lot of hard information.

Identifying When Someone is Operating a Computer Remotely 0

Identifying When Someone is Operating a Computer Remotely

Here’s an interesting technique to detect Remote Access Trojans, or RATS: differences in how local and remote users use the keyboard and mouse: By using biometric analysis tools, we are able to analyze cognitive traits such as hand-eye coordination, usage preferences, as well as device interaction patterns to identify a delay or latency often associated with remote access attacks.

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Attack Attribution and Cyber Conflict

The vigorous debate after the Sony Pictures breach pitted the Obama administration against many of us in the cybersecurity community who didn’t buy Washington’s claim that North Korea was the culprit. What’s both amazing — and perhaps a bit frightening — about that dispute over who hacked Sony is that it happened in the first place. But what it highlights is the fact that we’re living in a world where we can’t easily tell the difference between a couple of guys in a basement apartment and the North Korean government with an estimated $10 billion military budget