Tagged: schneier on security

MOOC on Cybersecurity 0

MOOC on Cybersecurity

The University of Adelaide is offering a new MOOC on “Cyberwar, Surveillance and Security.” Here’s a teaser video. I was interviewed for the class, and make a brief appearance in the teaser.

Spy Dust 0

Spy Dust

Used by the Soviet Union during the Cold War: A defecting agent revealed that powder containing both luminol and a substance called nitrophenyl pentadien (NPPD) had been applied to doorknobs, the floor mats of cars, and other surfaces that Americans living in Moscow had touched.

More on Chris Roberts and Avionics Security 0

More on Chris Roberts and Avionics Security

Last month, I blogged about security researcher Chris Roberts being detained by the FBI after tweeting about avionics security while on a United flight: But to me, the fascinating part of this story is that a computer was monitoring the Twitter feed and understood the obscure references, alerted a person who figured out who wrote them, researched what flight he was on, and sent an FBI team to the Syracuse airport within a couple of hours. There’s some serious surveillance going on. We know a lot more of the back story from the FBI’s warrant application .

Microbe Biometric 0

Microbe Biometric

Interesting : Franzosa and colleagues used publicly available microbiome data produced through the Human Microbiome Project (HMP), which surveyed microbes in the stool, saliva, skin, and other body sites from up to 242 individuals over a months-long period. The authors adapted a classical computer science algorithm to combine stable and distinguishing sequence features from individuals’ initial microbiome samples into individual-specific “codes.” They then compared the codes to microbiome samples collected from the same individuals’ at follow-up visits and to samples from independent groups of individuals. The results showed that the codes were unique among hundreds of individuals, and that a large fraction of individuals’ microbial “fingerprints” remained stable over a one-year sampling period