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Archive for the ‘Security Bloggers’ Category


Auditing TrueCrypt

Recently, Matthew Green has been leading an independent project to audit TrueCrypt. Phase I, a source code audit by iSEC Partners, is complete

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Schneier Talks and Interviews

Here are three articles about me from the last month.

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Schneier Speaking Schedule: April–May

Here’s my upcoming speaking schedule for April and May: Stanford Law School on April 15. Brown University in Providence, RI — two times — on April 24

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GoGo Wireless Adds Surveillance Capabilities for Government

The important piece of this story is not that GoGo complies with the law, but that it goes above and beyond what is required by law. It has voluntarily decided to violate your privacy and turn your data over to the government.

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Friday Squid Blogging: Bronze Giant Squid Sculpture

A little too big for my house.

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Police Disabling Their own Voice Recorders

This is not a surprise: The Los Angeles Police Commission is investigating how half of the recording antennas in the Southeast Division went missing, seemingly as a way to evade new self-monitoring procedures that the Los Angeles Police Department imposed last year. The antennas, which are mounted onto individual patrol cars, receive recorded audio captured from an officer’s belt-worn transmitter

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Heartbleed

Heartbleed is a catastrophic bug in OpenSSL: “The Heartbleed bug allows anyone on the Internet to read the memory of the systems protected by the vulnerable versions of the OpenSSL software. This compromises the secret keys used to identify the service providers and to encrypt the traffic, the names and passwords of the users and the actual content. This allows attackers to eavesdrop communications, steal data directly from the services and users and to impersonate services and users.

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"Unbreakable" Encryption Almost Certainly Isn’t

This headline is provocative: “Human biology inspires ‘unbreakable’ encryption.” The article is similarly nonsensical: Researchers at Lancaster University, UK have taken a hint from the way the human lungs and heart constantly communicate with each other, to devise an innovative, highly flexible encryption algorithm that they claim can’t be broken using the traditional methods of cyberattack. Information can be encrypted with an array of different algorithms, but the question of which method is the most secure is far from trivial.

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The Youngest Security Researcher

Five-year-old finds login vulnerability in Microsoft Xbox.

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