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About Perry Varanoid

Perry Varanoid has been a member since July 8th 2011, and has created 30193 posts from scratch.

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The Fundamental Insecurity of USB

This is pretty impressive:

Most of us learned long ago not to run executable files from sketchy USB sticks. But old-fashioned USB hygiene can’t stop this newer flavor of infection: Even if users are aware of the potential for attacks, ensuring that their USB’s firmware hasn’t been tampered with is nearly impossible. The devices don’t have a restriction known as “code-signing,” a countermeasure that would make sure any new code added to the device has the unforgeable cryptographic signature of its manufacturer. There’s not even any trusted USB firmware to compare the code against.

The element of Nohl and Lell’s research that elevates it above the average theoretical threat is the notion that the infection can travel both from computer to USB and vice versa. Any time a USB stick is plugged into a computer, its firmware could be reprogrammed by malware on that PC, with no easy way for the USB device’s owner to detect it. And likewise, any USB device could silently infect a user’s computer.

These are exactly the sorts of attacks the NSA favors.

The original article/video can be found at The Fundamental Insecurity of USB

Has Tor been #hacked by Black Hat speakers? let's hope so, the alternative is not cool at all

6 retweets 3 favorites

The original article/video can be found at Has Tor been #hacked by Black Hat speakers? let's hope so, the alternative is not cool at all

SolydX and SolydK Distros Updated with Latest Security Fixes from Debian

3 retweets 3 favorites

The original article/video can be found at SolydX and SolydK Distros Updated with Latest Security Fixes from Debian

Brazilians beware: Gizmodo Brazil compromised –> leads to backdoors and bad days

7 retweets 1 favorites

The original article/video can be found at Brazilians beware: Gizmodo Brazil compromised –> leads to backdoors and bad days

A Honeypot for home: Raspberry Pi, (Thu, Jul 31st)

In numerous previous Diaries, my fellow Internet Storm Center Handlers have talk on honeypots, the values of full packet capture and value of sharing any attack data. In this Diary I’m going to highlight a fairly simple and cost effective way of rolling those together. 

If you have an always on internet connection, having a honeypot listening to what is being sent your way is never bad idea. There’s plenty of ways to set up a honeypot, but a inexpensive way is to set up one up at home is with a Raspberry Pi [1]. The Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer, which can be hidden away out of sight easily, has a very low power consumption and is silent but works very well for a home honeypot.  

These are plenty of install guides to install the OS (I like using Raspbian), secure it then, drop your pick, or mix, of honeypot such as Kippo [2], Glastopf [3] or Dionaea [4] on it. Again, guides on how to set these up litter the intertubes, so take your pick. As additional step, I like to install tcpdump and plug in a Linux formatted 4Gb USB drive in to the Pi and then do full packet capture of any traffic that is directed to the Pi’s interface to the USB drive. Other than who doesn’t like to sifted through packet captures during downtime, there are times capturing the full stream provides insights and additional options (like running it through your IDS of choice) on the connections being made to you.

Once you have it all set up, secured, tested and running don’t forget to share the data with us, especially if you install Kippo [5]

From my observations, don’t expect a massive amount of interaction with your home honeypot, but you will see plenty of scanning activity. It’s a fairly interesting insight, especially if you pick a number of ports to forward on from your router/modem for the honeypot to listen on. If you do set up tcpdump to capture any traffic hitting the Raspberry Pi network interface (and haven’t set up a firewall to drop all non-specified traffic) is that it’ll pick up any chatty, confused or possibly malicious connections within your home network if they are broadcasting or scanning the subnet as well. With the Internet of Things being plugged in to home networks now, it’s always handy to have a little bit of notification if your fridge starts port scanning every device on your network…

As one of my fellow Handler, Mark Hofman, sagely mentioned:

“if you are going to set one up, make sure you fully understand what you are about to do.  You are placing a deliberately vulnerable device on the internet.  Depending on your location you may be held liable for stuff that happens (IANAL).  It it gets compromised, make sure it is somewhere where it can’t hurt you or others.”

So keep an eye on your Pi!

Happy honeypotting!

 

[1] http://www.raspberrypi.org/
[2] https://github.com/desaster/kippo
[3] http://glastopf.org/
[4] http://dionaea.carnivore.it/
[5] https://isc.sans.edu/diary/New+Feature%3A+%22Live%22+SSH+Brute+Force+Logs+and+New+Kippo+Client/18433

 

Chris Mohan — Internet Storm Center Handler on Duty

(c) SANS Internet Storm Center. https://isc.sans.edu Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 United States License.

The original article/video can be found at A Honeypot for home: Raspberry Pi, (Thu, Jul 31st)